investigation2.jpg

investigation

Investigation is more than just development.
It's about exploring every nook & cranny of your concept.

  Researching Inspiration  for, "White Heat"; Summer 2014, First Impressions, Macy's

Researching Inspiration  for, "White Heat"; Summer 2014, First Impressions, Macy's

 
  Splatter Jean Study; Spring 2017, Polo - Ralph Lauren

Splatter Jean Study; Spring 2017, Polo - Ralph Lauren

Now that the concept has been established and a clear direction has presented itself it's time to explore the tangible aspects of the collection.

First, the designer must take stock of the resources available to them through the brand. Whether it's the mills that can create a fabric you are developing or the people you are working with directly; it's important to know what is achievable for any given company.

Through this knowledge a design team can start crafting with these resources. Manipulating fabrics or finding new washes. Exploring a new print technique or trying a new way of finishing; are all dependent on a brands capabilities.

Now is also the time to ask tough questions and to question in general. Exploring the minutiae of a concept and achieving the desired results are all a part of this step in the process.

How can we achieve this color on this fabric?

Is this process sustainable?

What is the feasibility on our factories to achieve this detail in production?

Experimentation takes hold as the answers to these questions and more are discovered. The innate  characteristics through which a designer answers these questions are shaped by the brand's DNA. It's here that a team gathers the tools they need to execute a collection.

 

Translate your concept into tangible pieces.

  Woven Burnout / Discharge Print Study; 2004, Virgil Sparks

Woven Burnout / Discharge Print Study; 2004, Virgil Sparks

 
  Drape Study in Muslin; 2018, Virgil Sparks

Drape Study in Muslin; 2018, Virgil Sparks

In tandem with the big picture development of a concept into a collection, creativity takes hold during the Investigation process.

Manipulating fabrics and exploring hand-crafted details give a designer insight into the story they are wanting to tell. Creating plot points and harmony through the creative process. Taking fabric to form to find new shapes or cultivating new seam work all help to expand the vocabulary of the concept.

In this way of thinking; if the Investigation is a designer's outline, the Design is their first draft.